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School History

Eisenhower Middle School

Named for: President Dwight D. Eisenhower

In 1967, land was purchased for a new junior high school (34.55 acres). The city agreed to purchase adjoining land for school-park use of the entire site. The new school would relieve overcrowding at Arrowhead and Coronado and remove grade 9 from Washington. The voters, in 1970, passed a $24.5 million bond issue to provide for new schools, additions to schools, remodeling, less crowding, etc. In February of 1973, new boundary lines were established with a new attendance zone for Eisenhower, opening in September of that year with an enrollment of 1059. Bethel Memorial VFW presented a flag to the school, named in honor of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In early 1977, the district received a decision from the United States District Court which did not require major and mandatory relocation of students, but did require the desegregation of Northeast Junior and Sumner High Schools . That decision had been appealed to the Tenth Circuit of the Federal Courts by the Department of Justice in the hope of securing a ruling to require a “racial balance” in all schools. Such a decision would have required the mandatory relocation of thousands of students by a system of cross-district busing. At this point, only voluntary racial balance transfers were required at the elementary school level. Northeast Junior High was to be closed and its students and teachers reassigned to other schools. Sumner was to be converted to an academic magnet school in 1978. A committee of parents had spent the previous four months working through meetings to assure the smooth integration of pupils from Northeast Junior into Central, Rosedale , Argentine, Arrowhead and Eisenhower. Sumner Academy of Arts and Science was scheduled to open in September, 1978, as part of the desegregation plan.

The ninth grade was assigned to Washington High School in 1982 and all junior highs became middle schools serving grades 6-8.

Summary

1967 – Land purchased for new junior high school (34.55 acres).  City agreement to purchase adjoining land for joint school-park use of entire site.  New school to relieve overcrowding at Arrowhead and Coronado.  To remove grade 9 from Washington.

1970 – Voters passed a $24.5 million bond issue to provide for new schools, additions to schools, remodeling, less crowding, etc.

Students from junior high schools submitted names for consideration.

Architects:  McLain and Sidorwica.

Cost – Approximately $3,653,000.

Attached city recreation building allows joint use of recreational facilities on cooperative basis with city.  School adjoins city park.

1973 – February.  New boundary descriptions approved by Board, establishing new attendance area for Eisenhower.

First occupied.  Enrollment at 1059.  Opening delayed until September 4 in order to make sure equipment and supplies were received and organized.

September.  Bethel Memorial VFW presented flag to school.

1977 – Integration of pupils from Northeast Junior into Central, Rosedale, Argentine, Arrowhead and Eisenhower.  Sumner Academy of Arts and Science was scheduled to open in September, 1978, as part of the desegregation plan.  “Schools in KCKs in Years of Change, 1964-86,” by O. L. Plucker, Superintendent Emeritus, June, 1987 (pg. 50-52)

1982 – Ninth grade assigned to Washington High School.  All junior highs now to be middle schools serving grades 6-8.

2004 – Spray park planned for Eisenhower Park (park area around school grounds), featuring several poles with decorative spray heads on top of a concrete pad.  When the poles are touches, water will be released through the heads for a set time period.  There will be a spray park at Eisenhower Park and Pierson Park in Turner, costing $300,000, fueled by a 3,000-gallon underground tank, which will pump recycled, chemically treated water to the poles.  The water system will be fitted with a heater to warn the water on cooler days.  Fencing will be around the poles to keep dirt and other debris out.

2004 – Received a “Great IDEAS” grant (funded/sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Fund) for the 2004-05 school year, which encourages teachers in SLC’s (Small Learning Communities) to work together to develop innovative programs and projects to improve student learning.  Received $5,000.